A TV Series for Presenters and Presentation Designers

braingames

You might not believe it, but National Geographic’s Season 2 of Brain Games is a near perfect resource for presenters and presentation designers. While not perfectly scientifically accurate, the series contains a wealth of information about how our brain processes information and it’s delivered in an entertaining format. This is invaluable information if you are a presenter or presentation designer.

The official Brain Games web site has video clips, articles and the schedule for all 12 episodes. Amazon provides the series in both DVD and streaming format. Episodes are also available through NatGeo’s YouTube Channel for $1.99 per episode.

In addition to the series episodes, National Geographic’s Education web site has more resources on how your brain works and, finally, if you’re curious to see how your own brain stacks up, discover your own brain profile at the Interactive Brain Games web site. I highly recommend you watch the episodes first though or you might find you’re not as clever as you thought you were.

The Presentation Thespian

PowerPointNascar

I have a jacket that showcases badges and pins recognizing my expertise in PowerPoint. I always wear my “PowerPoint Nascar” jacket when attending events even if I don’t wear it when presenting. This jacket, combined with my techie clothes and trademark long ponytail, creates a brand that immediately identifies me as a PowerPoint technical expert.

Multiple studies have found that speakers who are perceived as credible, attractive and trustworthy are much more effective at persuading an audience and having them retain their message.

This provides presenters with an easy opportunity to capitalize on these findings.  By simply recognizing the theatrics of presentations and dressing the part, presenters can gain instant initial credibility.

I taken this idea and made a fully interactive tutorial. Through this tutorial you’ll learn how to use theatrical concepts to increase your appearance as a credible and trustworthy presenter. Click the icon in the lower right of the tutorial below to run it in full screen mode. Once the presentation starts, I recommend you click the SkyDrive link to Start Slide Show or you can start it directly from this link: The Theatrics of Presentations.

The PowerPoint Magic Trick & How the Brain Works

crystalballA few months ago I posted a blog article about why presenters should care about the psychology of the senses.  In that article I explained why mouse-overs can be used to fool an audience into thinking they’re seeing one slide when they’re really seeing two slides with a small difference.  I also posted a PowerPoint presentation which demonstrated the mouse-over technique.  Included in that presentation was the PowerPoint card trick which I said I would explain later.  I didn’t want to explain the trick until after I had posted the Gestalt of Slides because that tutorial covers a lot of the reasons why the card trick works.

If you haven’t seen the card trick, I’ve recreated it below.  Click the icon in the lower right of the presentation to run it in full screen mode. Or you can start it directly from this link: The PowerPoint Card Trick.  Don’t read below the embedded presentation until after you’ve watched the trick or you’ll spoil it for yourself.

Pretty amazing, yes?  Of course the trick doesn’t work for everyone, but it will fool most of us because of the way our brains are wired to process visual information.  A magician would tell you the trick works because of misdirection.  Typically, that means someone would be distracting your focus of attention so they could do something else, but that’s not really the case in the PowerPoint Card Trick.  I can instruct you to focus on a single card, but that’s the extent of the misdirection.

In this case the trick works mostly because of the Gestalt Principles of Perception.  If you went through my Gestalt of Slides tutorial you learned that we view our world holistically and our brains are predisposed to perceive patterns.  Once our brains perceive a pattern we tend to not pay attention to the details.  So in the case of the cards we perceive the red/black/red/black pattern and fail to pay attention to the rest of the details of the cards (except the one we focus on.)  This makes it appear as if I used PowerPoint to make your card disappear when, in fact, all the cards changed.

Interestingly enough, scientists are now realizing that magicians have a lot to offer in helping us figure our how our brains work.  I recently watched a NOVA special and to paraphrase one of the neuropsychologists, “We know how the brain processes visual information, but we don’t know what it pays attention to.”  In the special they use magicians to help them determine just that.  As a presenter this is very valuable information for you to know.  Imagine how much more effective you can be if, like a magician, you can direct (or distract) your audience’s attention to be exactly where you want it.

The biggest revelation of the study was how very much we pay attention to movement.  Basically if it moves, our eyes are going to follow it.  So if you have an item that you particularly want your audience to focus on then move it, move it, move it.  With PowerPoint animations this is so easily accomplished there’s no reason not to take advantage of it.  Even if you choose not to use the animations, simply moving the cursor, a pointer or even your arm can have the same effect.  Even moving your eyes will work because studies have shown we will automatically turn and look to see what the other person is looking at.  We track the movement of each other’s eyes.

Why do we do this?  It’s not too hard to imagine how helpful these traits were to primitive humans when they needed to see a predator in the bush and even today to avoid that oncoming car.

A word of caution, as far as our senses are concerned everything has a very fast extinction rate.  This means we’ll quickly quit paying attention to something that repeats.  Generally speaking, as far as our brains are concerned, if something is repetitive it’s probably not a danger and therefore not worth paying attention to.  So if you use too much movement, you’ll quickly lose your audience.

This is just one small thing covered by the special I watched so I happily post the link for your own viewing.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

NOVA – How Does the Brain Work?

Give an Itch, Scratch a Back

facebookcartoons

Why do some messages resonate (per Nancy Duarte) and some messages fall flat? This is what I wondered as I watched a recent movement on Facebook go viral. The concept was simple, you changed your profile picture to a cartoon from your childhood and then copied and pasted a statement in your status requesting all your friends do the same. The statement said this movement was to raise awareness of child abuse. And the response was phenomenal.

After two months of research on the psychology of motivation and persuasion I have the answer to my questions. Basically, there were three reasons why the cartoon profile pictures campaign worked:

  1. It was challenging, but not too challenging
  2. There was social pressure to participate
  3. It was for a good cause

While there’s no challenge to changing your profile picture, the challenge lay in finding a picture of a childhood cartoon that satisfactorily reflected your personality to your peers.

Peer pressure is fairly self-explanatory and in this instance self-perpetuating. The more friends who participated, the greater the pressure became to comply. One of my friends freely admitted the only reason she (finally) changed her profile picture was because she was succumbing to the social pressure. She also noted that she couldn’t see how changing her profile picture to a cartoon actually did anything to prevent child abuse.

Which brings me to the third point. A little research shows the raise awareness for child abuse comment was not part of the original campaign. And the original campaign had only moderate success. It wasn’t until this statement was added that the campaign went viral. We not only wanted the fun of portraying ourselves as cartoons and playing with our peers, we also needed to feel good about doing it. Happily enough, it did work to raise awareness of child abuse as the many news stories and articles on the campaign attest.

Its also worth noting that its unlikely this approach will work again. Persuasive tactics have a very rapid extinction rate. You’ve probably already seen similar status requests on Facebook with little to no success. Basically they’re viewed as a pale knock off of the original and the more they’re used, the less effective they become. A great example of this is the T-mobile vs. AT&T commercials that will never have the same success as the original Apple vs. PC commercials.

I wanted to share what I’ve learned with you so I’ve taken this research, selected the theories that I felt were most useful to presenters and made a fully interactive tutorial. Through this tutorial you’ll learn what moves us and how to make your message more persuasive. Click the icon in the lower right of the tutorial below to run it in full screen mode. Once the presentation starts, I recommend you click the SkyDrive link to Start Slide Show or you can start it directly from this link: Give an Itch, Scratch a Back.

I hope you enjoy learning about what moves us as much as I did.

Here Be Dragons

green_dragonMy daughter tells me that to have a successful blog I need to make frequent entries.  From that perspective, I must seem an abject failure.  My intent has always been, if possible, to include a tutorial with my posts and the type of tutorials I’m writing take time and effort to create.

I’ve been working on a tutorial about the psychology of motivation and persuasion but, because of the amount of research and information, it’s taking me a bit longer to complete than I’d originally anticipated. 

I don’t want to much too much time to pass between posts so, as a precursor for the tutorial on motivation, I invite you to watch this film titled “Here Be Dragons.”

This film is from exactly the opposite perspective, but having watched it, you’ll immediately recognize the theories covered in my upcoming tutorial.  Plus it’s just really cool and interesting.